Bridgeport High School Indian

515 Johnson Avenue

Bridgeport, WV  26330

304-326-7137

Indians

*AP English Literature (12th)

*Creative Writing (9th-12th)

*English 10


 

Creative Writing

Mrs. Lohmann


“All one can really leave one’s children is what’s inside their

heads.  Education, in other words, and not earthly possessions, is the

 ultimate legacy, the only thing that cannot be taken away.”

~Dr. Wernher von Braun~


This class is a year-long study of creative writing, with an emphasis on Appalachian literature.  Although you may not initially see the connection, the relationship of the two is symbiotic and advantageous for pairing in the classroom.


Creative Writing       

            You will be writing—constantly!  This class challenges you to write in a variety of genres and encourages you to step outside your “comfort zone” in writing.  The following are major components of the creative writing portion of the class:

           

Writing Prompts/Revisions

Almost every day you will write one or two pieces based on a student- or teacher-created prompt.  It is imperative that you place your name, date, and prompt name on each piece you write in order to receive credit for each assignment.  Points will be given for completing these assignments without penalty for mechanics/spelling.  After 5 to 10 prompts have been written, a revision will be assigned.  These are generally worth 50 to 100 points and must be typed (mechanics will factor into this grade).

           

Image Notebook

            You will keep an image notebook that will be collected approximately

twice per six weeks.  This will be explained in greater detail in a separate

handout.


Literary Magazine

            During the course of the year, some class time will be dedicated to the

production of the school’s literary magazine The Legacy.   You are welcome to

submit your work throughout the year for the magazine.


Children’s Book/Equal Project

You will write and illustrate a children’s book (don’t panic—you may enlist the help of someone with artistic ability if yours if lacking J) OR present an

idea of equal merit.  Examples of this include a screenplay, a multi-chapter work,

a play, a magazine, etc.


Appalachian Literature

            You will be exposed to/study the literature, history, and culture of the Appalachian region.  Possible topics of study include but are not limited to the following:

  • Family celebrations/holidays
  • Dialect/language
  • Sense of place
  • Nature lore
  • Oral literature
  • Folk arts, music, and dance
  • Perception of Appalachian


Projects

            You will complete an Appalachian project/paper on a topic of your choice.  You may also complete a family oral history.


Written literature (may include but is not limited to the following)

  • Novel-Storming Heaven by Denise Giardina
  • Short stories/collections
  • Children’s Books
  • Poetry/Poets


Grading

Six weeks’ grades will be determined by a cumulative point system (all work will be graded by points and averaged for the final grade which follows the Harrison County Schools grading scale).  Extra credit opportunities may arise during the course of a six weeks.  These opportunities will not be available to those who have more than one missing assignment. 

The school’s Retest policy mandates that any students scoring below a 60% on test must complete a retake for the opportunity to score up to a 65%.  Students scoring between a 60-64% will be given the option of a retake.

Late Work/Homework Passes

Work is to be turned in on its assigned date. Students not turning in work on its due date will be assigned Lunch-to-Learn and receive partial credit for the completed assignment. Work turned in later than Lunch-to-Learn assignment will be for half credit.  Please be aware that some assignments may not be turned in the next day (ex. a reading guide that we go over the answers the same day it is to be completed).  Late work will be accepted for full credit only in extenuating circumstances and at the teacher’s discretion. 

We all have a bad or busy day/evening from time to time and find it hard to complete all necessary tasks.  For this reason, each student may use three homework passes during the course of the semester.  A pass entitles you to turn in an assignment one class period after its deadline without penalty; it does not eliminate the need to complete the assignment!


Make Up Work

You are expected to obtain make up work without prompting from the teacher.  There will be class-specific make up folders by my door.  Clarification of missed assignments must be taken care of before or after class (not during instructional time).  Quizzes and tests may need to be made up during lunch, homeroom, or after school (depending on what is planned during class).  Harrison County policy allows for one make up day for each day missed.


Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated in this course.  This includes cheating on homework, quizzes, tests, or papers.   A zero will be given for the assignment and appropriate disciplinary action will be taken.  While the internet is a magnificent tool, it has been the demise of many students’ integrity.  “Internet borrowing” is cheating.  Without giving appropriate credit to any ideas other than your own, you have plagiarized.  Please do not jeopardize your grade, your National Honor Society status, or most importantly, your character by stealing others’ work.  


Technology

All formal papers must be typed.  If computer access is not available at home, the school library is an option during lunch or homeroom. Formal writing assignments are always given several days prior to their deadlines.  You must have the paper printed when you come to class; you may not leave class to print.

Right-click to bring up menu with options.

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~ENGLISH 10~

2014-2015

Mrs. Lohmann


Course Description

This course content emphasizes vocabulary development, critical reading of various genres of literature, and the study of the process of writing from the topic to the preliminary drafts to the final edited edition. 

Basic Classroom Expectations

  1. Be kind to and respectful of others. Derogatory comments will not be tolerated.
  2. Try your hardest, and ask for help when you need it. You should expect the best out of your work and behavior; don’t get mad when I expect the same.
  3. BE ENGAGED in all we do in class!
  4. Everyone loves building forts—blanket forts, snow forts, sand forts, etc; however, purse and book forts are not allowed on your desks. Your cell phone will still love you after class.
  5. Attitude truly is the biggest factor in determining your success in this class—and in life!

Attendance

Although a grade may not be lowered based on attendance, it is crucial to a student’s success to be present and engaged in the classroom.  Daily participation/discussion grades may be given.

Grading

Six weeks’ grades will be determined by a cumulative point system (all work will be graded by points averaged for the final grade which follows the Harrison County Schools grading scale). 

The school’s Retest policy mandates that any students scoring below a 60% on test must complete a retake for the opportunity to score up to a 65%.  Students scoring between a 60-64% will be given the option of a retake.


Late Work/Homework Passes

Work is to be turned in on its assigned date.  Students not turning in work on its due date will be assigned Lunch-to-Learn and receive partial credit for the completed assignment.  Late work will be accepted for full credit only in extenuating circumstances and at the teacher’s discretion. 

We all will have a bad or busy day/evening from time to time and find it hard to complete all necessary tasks.  For this reason, each student may use three homework passes during the course of the semester.  A pass entitles you to turn in an assignment one class period after its deadline without penalty; it does not eliminate the need to complete the assignment! Homework passes do not apply to reading assignments that may result in reading checks.


Make Up Work

You are expected to obtain make up work without prompting from the teacher.  There will be class-specific make up folders by my door.  Clarification of missed assignments must be taken care of before or after class (not during instructional time).  Quizzes and tests may need to be made up during lunch, homeroom, or after school (depending on what is planned during class).  Harrison County policy allows for one make up day for each day missed.


Academic Integrity

Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated in this course.  This includes cheating on homework, quizzes, tests, or papers.   A zero will be given for the assignment and appropriate disciplinary action will be taken.  While the internet is a magnificent tool, it has been the demise of many students’ integrity.


“Internet borrowing” is cheating.  Without giving appropriate credit to any ideas other than your own, you have plagiarized.  Please do not jeopardize your grade, your National Honor Society status, or most importantly, your character by stealing others’ work.  


Technology

All formal papers must be typed.  If computer access is not available at home, students may use those in the school library.  Writing assignments are always given several days prior to their deadlines. 


I realize computer/printer issues sometimes arise; if this happens to you, you should send your completed assignment in the appropriate format to your LiveGrades account (not to mine) and print it prior to coming to my class. If you come to class late because you were printing your paper, you will receive a late grade.


Assignments/Course Material

Throughout the semester we will study many pieces of literature from various genres. Most units will be arranged thematically and involve multiple reading and writing assignments.


Sample Texts/Readings (the following list may be changed at the teacher’s discretion)

Glencoe Literature: The Reader’s Choice

            *we will study/read many poems, short stories, narratives, and plays from

  this text

The Book Thief—Markus Zusak

A Midsummer Night’s Dream—William Shakespeare

A Separate Peace—John Knowles

A novel of the class’s choosing


Writing Assignments will include but are not limited to the following:

Journal entries/responses

Creative writing prompts/assignments

Short story/poems

Formal essays

  • Narrative
  • Persuasion
  • Compare/contrast
  • Cause and Effect
  • Problem-Analysis
  • Research writing


Itineraries

You will receive more detailed information about individual units throughout the semester that include reading schedules, deadlines for papers and projects, and approximate dates for tests.


Amy Lohmann

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